About Dr Samantha Velluti

Previously at Manchester and Liverpool Law Schools as lecturer in EU law. I have researched and written extensively in the area of EU governance and constitutionalism and the Open Method of Co-ordination in the context of employment, gender equality and immigration. More recently, I have been carrying out research in the field of EU asylum law and policy examining legislative developments and the judicial activism of the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights. Other areas of research include the promotion of human rights and international labour standards in the EU external trade law and policy and in this context the relationship between the European Union and other International organisations as well as its relationship with third countries. I welcome collaborative research projects, including inter-disciplinary work, and Ph.D proposals focusing on these areas of research.

Professor Dora Kostakopoulou Talk on ‘Contemporary Perspectives of EU Citizenship’

Lincoln Law School – Law in a Global Context Research Group Seminar – 13 May 2015

On 13 May, Professor Dora Kostakopoulou gave a talk on ‘Contemporary Perspectives of EU Citizenship’. By exploring different theorisations of the European integration process and in particular using the lens of institutional constructivism Dora Kostakopoulou traced and examined the development of the evolving concept of European Union Citizenship. By looking at key decisions of the Court of Justice of the European Union she reflected on the problems concerning the development of a European identity vis-à-vis national identities and, on more general level, the interconnectedness between the incremental and transformative change of the European integration process and the evolution of European Union Citizenship.

Dora Kostakopoulou is Professor of European Union Law, European Integration and Public Policy at the School of Law of the  University of Warwick. She joined Lincoln Law School as Visiting Professor in 2015.

International and European Law Research Seminar – 2 April by Dr Kwadwo Appiagyei-Atua

International and European Law Research Seminar 2 April 2014

Dr Kwadwo Appiagyei-Atua gave a talk on ‘Contributionism or Twailism: A Critical Review of African Perspectives on International Law’

The presentation was devoted to introducing African perspectives into International Law, which has remained to a large extent predominantly Euro-centric in doctrine, theory and practice.

Dr Appiagyei-Atua provided a critique of two main schools developed by African scholarship in reaction to the European ‘hegemonic’ influence in International Law, namely, Contributionism and Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL). The former seeks to reclaim, reconstruct and rehabilitate the neglected and denigrated African past and put it on an even keel with Europe. In so doing it contends that Africans participated in shaping International Law and that their contribution should be thus acknowledged and recognised. The latter, seeks to expose the exploitative side of International Law and present an alternative normative model that pays attention to justice and fairness in order to eradicate conditions of underdevelopment.

Dr Appiagyei-Atua’s critique unravelled a new middle-ground approach, that of recognitionism. This new perspective locates itself within the pre-colonial era to uncover the origins of International Law in Africa and contends that African regions developed notions of primitive International Law within their own limited geographical spaces before contact with Europe and other civilisations.

Dr Appiagyei-Atua concluded by showing how the contributions from Africa and other developing countries are only piecemeal and have mainly come through the United nations system without significantly altering the current International legal order.

Dr Appiagyei-Atua is currently a Marie Curie Fellow at the Centre for Educational Research and Development of the University of Lincoln. He is also Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra. At present he is writing a book entitled Commonwealth African Perspectives on Public International Law.

Presentation by Dr Velluti at the KU Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies (Belgium)

Dr Velluti recently gave a presentation  entitled ‘The Evolving Social Dimension of EU External Trade Relations – Some Reflections on Coherence’ at the International Workshop on Fostering Labor Rights in the Global Economy, held at the KU Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies of the University of Leuven on 20 and 21 February 2014 and co-organised together with GRESI, a scientific research community funded by the Flemish Fund for Scientific Research (FWO) and coordinated by the University of Ghent. The Workshop is part of the large-scale EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) research project on “Fostering Human Rights among European Policies” (FRAME).

The paper provided a critical review of how labour provisions have been incorporated in the European Union’s (EU) international trade agreements and the various goals pursued in combination with the mechanisms employed to achieve them. This analysis is particularly prominent and made necessary by fundamental changes introduced by the 2009 Treaty of Lisbon in relation to the EU’s Common Commercial Policy (CCP) and the increased powers of the European Parliament which now has to give its consent to the ratification of international trade agreements. In examining how the EU has been increasingly inserting human rights clauses and social norms in its international trade agreements with third countries, Dr Velluti explored certain coherence, consistency and legitimacy aspects of the EU’s role as a global human rights actor which directly concern the future trajectory of social and labour rights in EU external trade relations.

Lincoln Law School holds two research events in February 2014

Lincoln Law School held two research events in February 2014.

On 5 February 2014, Dr Klaus Beiter, Marie Curie Fellow at CERD, University of Lincoln, gave a presentation on ‘The Protection of the Right to Academic Mobility under International Human Rights Law’. The paper presented some preliminary findings of current research which Dr Beiter is carrying out as part of his postdoc on the topic: “Safeguarding Academic Freedom in Europe”, under the supervision of Professor Terence Karran (CERD, University of Lincoln).
Dr Beiter examined the right to freedom of movement of scholars – conceived as a right to academic mobility – as part of the right to academic freedom. In his presentation he explained how (binding) international human rights law does not accord express protection to this right. Whereas the right to freedom of opinion and expression in Article 19 of the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights may be relied on to protect a multitude of facets covered by the right to academic freedom, Article 13 of the 1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on the right to education may, in fact, be seen to constitute a complete locus for the right to academic freedom.

On 19 February 2014, Professor Louis J. Kotzé from the North-West University in South Africa, gave a talk on sustainable development as a key feature of environmental constitutionalism using South Africa as his main case-study. In his talk, Professor Kotzé examined South Africa’s domestic legal regime to illustrate how certain national legal systems have constitutionally entrenched sustainable development. In particular, in South Africa, sustainable development has been an integral part of the legal order since the advent of democracy and transition to a constitutional state in 1994. The country included an environmental right in its own Constitution of 1996 and adopted a comprehensive body of environmental legislation to give effect to this right’s broader policies and constitutional objectives. Professor Kotzé illustrated how by means of this entrenchment, sustainable development has become a constitutional issue or concern in the country and may play, therefore, an important role in promoting a rule of law approach in South Africa.

Lincoln Law School International and European Law Research Seminar – 6 November 2013

Lincoln Law School International and European Law Research Seminar – 6 November 2013

Professor Jeff Kenner, Professor of European Law, University of Nottingham – ‘Shaping the Social Dimension of Globalisation? An Analysis of the Strategic Partnership between the EU and the ILO’

The presentation explored the roles played by the EU and the ILO in forging a strategic partnership to advance the social dimension of globalisation. The EU and the ILO have worked in close cooperation from the formation of the Community with both actors benefiting from the cross-fertilisation of policies and methods for the adoption, observance and enforcement of transnational labour standards and, latterly, the promotion of fundamental social rights.

Professor Kenner identified and examined three phases of the strategic partnership between the EU and the ILO. The paper concluded with a focus on the further evolution of the EU/ILO relationship as a force for the advancement of the social dimension of globalisation and questioned the extent to which it is possible, or desirable, for the EU to ‘shape’ globalisation by protecting its social model internally and promoting ILO standards externally.

Jeff Kenner is Professor of European Law in the School of Law, University of Nottingham. He is a legal expert of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency and the European Commission. He is also project leader for the HRLC team on FRAME (Fostering Human Rights Among European Policies), a large-scale and collaborative research project involving 19 research centres from around the world under the EU’s Seventh Framework Programme.